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“Others Too”: Zoom's Terrible Communication Misstep

by Pierre Morsa

You may have heard about it, a basic security problem was found in Zoom for Mac, that allowed attackers to turn the camera on remotely. Zoom is an application used to organize videoconferences on the web. It works well and has been widely adopted by corporations and individuals seeking to provide a quality service to employees working remotely or on different sites. The security problem itself was easy to correct, and, at the time of this article, should have been fixed.

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Put your most nervous speakers early in the program

by Pierre Morsa

One of the most stressful moments when speaking at an event is actually not during your presentation, but the hours before your presentation. To some speakers, the wait can be so stressful that they completely lose their presence. As mother nature didn’t give humans an appropriate instinctive response to face the stress of a presentation, they adopt one of the basic survival techniques for protection: they fight the public, they flee, or they “play dead”.

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Start with the subject, not the context

by Pierre Morsa

You know these presenters who speak for 20 minutes before they finally understand what they are talking about? I had a colleague who was just like that. When I asked him why he couldn’t do a shorter introduction, he said that he felt that all the details he gave in his opening were indispensable to understand the presentation. In other words, he was taking the time to explain the context before talking about his subject.

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Should I move on stage when speaking?

by Pierre Morsa

Should we move on stage when speaking, to avoid looking static? Or should we stay put on our feet, avoiding any unnecessary movements? Strangely, if we ask different coaches, we’re likely to get different answers. I remember meeting several coaches who followed classical theatre training at “La Comédie Française”, and they would recommend that you don’t move on stage when you’re speaking. I also remember other coaches telling startup pitchers that they looked like dead trees devoid of any energy because they didn’t move enough.

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The body language myth of crossing your arms

by Pierre Morsa

The communication industry is full of myths that are repeated without any scientific backing. I recently watched this video by a former FBI body language specialist. He used his skills to help bust criminals. The first thing he does (at 1’10”) is bust the myth that crossing your arms is a blocking behavior. Bingo. I cannot agree more with this. Most people cross their arms because it’s a comfortable position, not because they have a mental block, period.

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